Is Giant Eagle in the USA like Giant Tiger in Canada?

Lol, my elderly cat has moved into my old birdcage.

upallnightogetloki:

afro-dominicano:

dynastylnoire:

I heard his story on NPR. His mom raised him to “not see color” etc. And the cops beat  the hell out of him when they pulled him over. It took seeing him in jail beaten half to death for her to see that race matters every day.

"I thought that love would conquer all and skin color really didn’t matter. I had to learn the really hard way when they almost killed you."

Shit like this is why that “I don’t see color” bullshit is anything whack to toxic to downright dangerous. You don’t see color? Too damn bad because it’s there. Do not ignore it. It is not something to be ashamed of and it is ok to embrace those differences so long as it’s respectfully and not in a way that is fucking harmful.

Ignoring color means ignoring what people of color had to and still have to go through in a world that sees color and that’s disrespectful. And if you try to ignore color when you are from a race that people who DO see color and HATE it loathe the most? Yea, you’re gonna have problems.

Put ‘colorblindness’ in the same “Shit Don’t Work” box as ‘respectability politics’, wrap a weighted chain around it and toss it in the river. Shit’ll do you as much good down there as anywhere else aka no good at all.

AND WHITE PARENTS OF CHILDREN OF COLOR, DO NOT TEACH THEM THIS BULLSHIT, IT CAN GET YOUR CHILD KILLED AND YOUR WHITENESS WILL HAVE DONE SHIT TO SAVE THEM!

(via bdub86)

diligenda:

White people who support Darren Wilson

(Source: wenchyfloozymoo, via queenconsuelabananahammock)

avajae:

As I’ve been going through the intern slush, I’ve noticed that many times, when I recommend a rejection, it’s largely because of voice. Voice, to me, is one of the most important elements in a novel, because if it’s wrong on the first page, it’s usually wrong throughout the whole manuscript.

Being that I read a lot of YA submissions, this post is largely centered on voice-related problems I frequently see with YA submissions. But many of these issues can also apply to NA by looking at the points with a slightly older cast in mind.

YA Voice Red Flags:

  • Lack of contractions. This can actually be a problem in any category, but it’s especially important in YA manuscripts—a voice without any contractions always sounds stiff. This is one of the easiest (and often one of the first) voice-related red flags I pick out. Why? Because we speak and think with contractions, so when they’re absent, the writing becomes stilted and loses a great deal of flow, making it extraordinarily easy to pick it out. “I am not feeling well so I can not go,” for example, doesn’t sound nearly as fluid as, “I’m not feeling well so I can’t go.” Agreed? Good.
  • Outdated slang. If you’re writing YA, you need to be current with the language—no exceptions. For examples, teenagers today don’t really say “talk to the hand” or “phat” or “what’s the 411” anymore. (Note: those weren’t taken from actual submissions, I’m just giving outdated examples). Outdated slang, to me, is an enormous red flag and tells me the writer isn’t reading enough YA. 
  • Forced (current) slang. This is an equally problematic, but harder to spot problem. Sometimes I see submissions that use current slang, but the waythey use it feels…off. This is a little harder to describe, but the easiest way to ferret them out of your manuscript is to have critique partners and/or beta readers who are up to date with the current slang read your manuscript. 
  • Corny curse substitutions. This is a biggie. While not all teenagers curse, many of them do—and when they don’t, they don’t often use corny substitutions. “Frickin’” for example, could work as a substitution for a particular four-letter word, but “french fries” probably won’t. 

    Note: UNLESS your character makes a point of being corny, or it fits with your voice. I won’t say this never works (because I’m sure there’s a book out there that can make it happen), but to be honest, I’ve yet to see it work successfully with exception to “D’Arvit” in Artemis Fowl, which mostly worked because it wasn’t corny—it was a made up gnomish word. 
  • Teenager stereotypes. This is huge. When I see teenager stereotypes blended into the voice or the characters, it almost always puts me off. Teenagers are not a sum of their stereotypes, and relying on them in your writing, quite frankly, is lazy. You can do better–and teenagers deserve better. 


Solutions:

  • Listen to teenagers talk. A lot. Don’t have a teenager in your life? That’s fine—watch YA-centered TV shows and movies. They tend to feature teenagers who are effortlessly up to date with current slang, references, etc. Or go to your local mall and do a little (subtle) eavesdropping. Yes, really. It’s research. 
  • Read YA. By and large, the YA that’s published today (especially if it’s relatively recent) have great examples of successful YA voices. Read them. Learn from them. Write your own. (This step by the way? Not optional if you’re writing YA). 
  • Get critique partners. This is so ridiculously important—make sure you have beta readers and critique partners look at your work. I personally recommend having several rounds of betas and CPs, so you can see if the changes you made in the first round, for example, were as effective as you hoped. 


Would you add anything to either list? Unmentioned problems? Solutions?

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

ninfia:

im going to inject garlic bread into my blood stream 

Hey, queenconsuelabananahammock!

(Source: fruitpacks, via --yucks--)

puppymother:

in grade 11 i was on the phone w this boy i wanted and i owed him a favour or something so i was like “it can be anything you want” and he was like “anything?” and im like ya thats what i fuckin said and he goes “can you explain to me how a fridge works? like how does it stay cold”

(via lordlouiedor)

plgrace:

Self-esteem Shark has spoken

plgrace:

Self-esteem Shark has spoken

(via lordlouiedor)

queenconsuelabananahammock:

seasaltinecrackers:

human versions of the lion king where everyone is white

image

Saving this reaction pic for when people say Egyptians were white.

reblog if you had a livejournal

crazyloststar:

REPRESENT

(Source: likeitsstolen, via lavishness)